The Troublesome Terror Psalms Bundle

Poetry collection, Raw Dog Screaming Press, 2015

Troublesome Terror Psalms coverThis bundle includes the three most acclaimed works by poet John Edward Lawson, collectively earning nominations for the Dwarf Stars, Elgin, Rhysling, and Stoker Awards.

The Troublesome Amputee: Welcome to one of the meatiest collections of grizzly, grotey, bizarro poetry you’ll come across. In other words, “the good stuff.” The stuff you like to read. The guilty pleasure stuff that’s hard to come by. Not the stuff you used to read from your lovers or childhood heroes, or the stuff you were made to read by your teachers or parents. The stuff you genuinely like to spend time with, musing and mulling and mashing. The stuff that makes you guffaw with laughter and want to read out loud to other unsuspecting people. (From the introduction by Michael A. Arnzen)

SuiPsalms: SuiPsalms is the follow up to Lawson’s first, acclaimed poetry collection, The Troublesome Amputee. Exploring the subject of suicide from all angles, this collection challenges pre-conceived notions and both poetry and suicide. Drawing on influences from Sylvia Plath to Ian Curtis this book is never quite what you expect.

Wholesome Terror: The sheer terror of hope has been dissected and repackaged as standard rhymes, experimental verse, and other poetic forms in order to rendition the reader blissfully numb. These are poems that contain elements of eroticism, satire, political commentary, and horror wherein the reader need not wonder how many times can Lady Lazarus be resurrected after waterboarding, because they find themselves acting as her proxy in this endeavor. Wholesome Terror is a savage, hydrophobic dog of a book curled up with the reader’s throat comfortably within reach.

Available at Amazon

Part of a readers group?
Part of a readers group? Download the free printable Troublesome Amputee Resource Guide.
Part of a readers group? Download the free printable SuiPsalms Resource Guide.
Part of a readers group? Download the free printable Wholesome Terror Resource Guide.


Praise for the Individual Works:

The Troublesome Amputee

“I believe I am now a Lawson convert. The Troublesome Amputee has opened my eyes to new possibilities in poetry, and I am eager to seek out more of his work. Lawson has a way of getting under my skin with his words, making them memorable long after the pages have closed. That said, I wouldn’t recommend reading many of the poems in one sitting; there are so many ideas and images that come so quickly that I needed time in between readings to process things properly. Too much is bound lead to some sort of mental or emotional overload.”
Somebody Dies

“Lawson is genuinely one of the best horror poets writing today.”
The Swallow’s Tail

“There are few books like this one. Even within the new and growing Bizarro movement Lawson has released a book full literary razorblades in the form of poetry. Lawson’s work shines through the whole spectrum, including funny, sad, morbid, disgusting and meaningful poems. Libraries looking offer a unique book of poetry that spits in the face of conventional, sugary sweet, or pretentious ‘literary’ poetry, that expresses a dissident voice of gloom should put this book in the shelf. Recommended.”
Monster Librarian

SuiPsalms

“Packed with a variety of texts that stretch the definition of poetry to the breaking point, SuiPsalms is honest from the beginning…In a standardized world, Lawson’s work is the equivalent of a juggling octopus jumping out of your morning coffee… While there is enough death and darkness to argue this is horror poetry, the book’s diversity makes classification impossible.”
—Black Heart Magazine

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The man your librarian warned you about…

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